Finally, revenue that comes from delighting your customer should be easier to track since you already have a purchase on file. You’ll likely have a user profile for each customer or some form of contact information from them — every return visit won’t correlate to a new sale, but tracking their behavior will give you a good idea of how many return visitors convert. Then apply this percentage to the number of return website visitors and you’re set! Hopefully, your sales department will also have a good idea of how many first time buyers purchase more than once.
You also want to use your data and insights to adjust your future video strategy. View-through rate should inform the length of your video, audience demographics should inform content, characters, and voice-over in your video, and most successful distribution channels should inform where to prioritize distribution efforts. Use this data to create a more detailed strategy next time around so you can set up any future marketing videos you create for success.
All of these questions can help determine what type of video you should make and where you should post it. For example, if your target audience is not familiar with your company, you probably want to make a video that focuses on brand awareness before producing an in-depth, product video. You'll also want to host your video on a site that already has a large reach, like YouTube.
Do you want to attract a new audience to your brand? This top-of-funnel goal is the broadest and probably the easiest to measure. Attracting an audience means presenting your brand as the solution to a problem that was recently introduced to the viewer. This will likely be your first interaction with them, so you want to make sure it’s a memorable one.
There are two crucial components to any video: audio and visuals. On production day, you want to make sure both are meeting your standards. You’ll want to test all your equipment and work with an experienced producer to get the best sound and picture possible. You’ll want to check all the sound equipment (mics, booms, and more), as well as all your camera equipment. If you’re on set, make sure your shots match your storyboard and your brand style. If you’re not on set, ask for photos or video chat for a few minutes to make sure your video is coming together as it should.

No matter your industry, target audience, or whether you're B2B or B2C, there is no doubt that today a large portion of your potential buyers are on social media. And well-planned, consistently-created video allows you to connect with that audience time and time again to drive awareness and enagagement more effectively than any other form of content.
Instead, place a laptop below the eye-line of the camera. Break the script into short paragraphs and record it section by section until you capture a great take of each. If you plan in advance when the final video will show b-roll (supplementary footage or screenshots), you can have your talent read those lines directly off the laptop like a voice over.
Professional cameras, like DSLRs, give you fine control over the manual settings of shooting video and allow you to achieve the shallow depth of field (background out of focus) that people rave about. While they're primarily used for photography, DSLRs are incredibly small, work great in low light situations, and pair with a wide range of lenses — making them perfect for video. However, DSLRs do require some training (and additional purchases) of lenses.
×